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Critic Review Round Up! 'Pacific Rim' 
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 Critic Review Round Up! 'Pacific Rim'
Source : MSN

Quote:
3 out of 4 stars

'PACIFIC RIM': MONSTERS VS. ALIENS? YES, PLEASE!

Yes, it's true: "Pacific Rim" is every bit as big and loud and bombastic as movie observers predicted and early reviewers are reporting. But it's also a few other things, among them fun. And it's also among the few genuinely joyous sci-fi blockbusters I've seen in quite some time.

That seems like an odd, and even perverse, thing to say about a movie that envisions a future in which gigantic, grotesque beasts from beneath the sea, termed "Kaiju" (a Japanese word actually applied to the film genre that produced Godzilla and others), have laid waste to many of the world's great cities, and substantial parts of the populations therein. (Why undersea, you ask? Because the alien threat to the world, for the kaiju are indeed products of that very thing, turns out to be extra-dimensional rather than extraterrestrial. It's kinda complicated.) Those horrific creatures are battled by giant robots co-piloted by psychically linked "Jaegers" (German for hunters, and if there's a German film genre built around the term I'm not sure I wanna know about it) who, by 2020, may be Earth, or at least humanity's, final hope.

The reason "joyous" applies though has to do with Guillermo Del Toro, the movie's director, an accomplished and energetic genre aficionado who's clearly thrilled to be making his own giant monster movie in the dual tradition of Ishiro Honda and Ray Harryhausen, the two filmmaking icons to which he dedicates the movie. "Pacific Rim"'s future world is overflowing with quirky detail, and the movie's scenario serves up a lot of conventional tropes with unusual energy. The movie's lead, Raleigh (Charlie Hunnam), is the standard-issue former fighting ace now licking his wounds after a personal tragedy, brought back into the Jaeger fold by a single-minded commander with issues of his own (Idris Elba). His new co-pilot in the mind-meld called "the drift" is Mako Mori (Rinko Kukuchi), not as enigmatic a foil as she first seems, and a pretty refreshing female action figure in a summer that's woefully short on such things. Adding some "Top Gun" style rivalry is a petulant Aussie Jaeger (Max Martini), and contributing comic relief are a pair of mad scientists played by Charlie Day and Burn Gorman and an imposing contraband dealer played by Del Toro stalwart Ron Perlman.

The real stars, of course, are the creatures and the robots who battle them, and the stomach-rumbling, temple-throbbing action sequences are pretty formidable in 3D, although at times the speed of the images and the bone-crunching volume of the soundtrack threaten to relegate the movie into a more generic realm than it wants or deserves to be. But just when it starts feeling oppressive or samey Del Toro pulls out a witty visual detail (as in the amusing appearance of a Newton's cradle at the end of one real-estate-damage extravaganza) or a gratifying character bit. But the movie is more than the sum of its grace notes; the gargantuanism IS a feature, not a bug. If you can't hang with it, then maybe this isn't for you. But if you are hankering for a really BIG monster movie that won't, well, insult either your intelligence or your love for big monster movies, this is just the ticket.


Source: IGN

[youtube_w]1722LFAr894[/youtube_w]

Source: HuffingtonPost

Quote:
'Pacific Rim' Review: Noisy Monsters Vs. Robots Blockbuster Still Fun

It's one of the saving graces of "Pacific Rim," Guillermo del Toro's new mega-budget monsters vs. robots extravaganza, that at a key juncture, it knows how to make fun of itself.

This welcome bit of comic relief amid all the crunching, smashing and groaning in 3-D comes just as the good guys – that would be the robots, or rather the humans operating the 25-story machines built to save humanity – have hit a snag. These massive, digitally controlled contraptions suddenly all fail at once.

But then – eureka! – someone points out that one rusty old robot is analog. And so, in a movie that has spent some $200 million to boast the very best in state-of-the-art tradecraft, an analog machine saves the day, at least temporarily. Ha! Holy retro technology.

It's too bad that del Toro's film, a throwback to the Japanese Kaiju monster films made famous by "Godzilla," doesn't have many more such deft moments. Though it's made by an obviously gifted director and will likely please devotees of the genre, it ultimately feels very short on character and long on noise, noise, noise. Did we mention the crunching, smashing and groaning?

Happily, the plot is not convoluted (the script is by Travis Beacham and del Toro) and there's at least one really cool concept, called "The Drift." No, this doesn't involve land formations.

It's the mind-melding that occurs between the two pilots of each Jaeger – that's what they call the mega-robots that humans have built to fight the monsters rising from the sea. Subjected to a pre-flight "neural handshake," the pilots are suddenly sharing brains, the better to command their robot.

This leads to amusing dialogue, such as: "You know what I'm thinking?" Beat. "I'm in your brain!" That's meant to be funny, but a later remark seems inadvertently so, when the hero balks at going back to battle: "I can't have anyone in my head again!"

The real action begins some seven years into the Kaiju offensive (and circa 2020.) The Jaeger program, once successful, is failing. Global defense authorities decide to drop it and go for a giant coastal wall. Didn't they see "World War Z?" Ask Brad Pitt: Walls don't keep out zombies, and they won't keep Kaiju out, either. It's back to the Jaegers.

Enter jaded former pilot Raleigh Becket (a handsome but bland Charlie Hunnam). Raleigh lost his co-pilot and brother in a Jaeger fight, and is in no mind to share his, er, mind again. But humanity's at stake.

His new co-pilot is a young Japanese woman named Mako (Rinko Kikuchi) with a serious beef against the Kaiju. Showy supporting parts are played by Idris Elba as the impressively named commander Stacker Pentecost; Charlie Day as a manic, nerdy scientist (but not as funny as he could be); and Ron Perlman as a shadowy Kaiju-parts dealer.

It takes a good hour for the real battle to get going. You're glad when it does, but mostly, you wish the mind-melding concept had been mined more fully, especially since the scenes inside people's minds show, too briefly, another, subtler side of del Toro's talents. One arresting flashback to Mako's youth almost seems to come from a different movie – like the dloeperloeirector's powerful 2006 "Pan's Labyrinth." Too bad del Toro doesn't share a bit more of that terrific side of his moviemaking mind with us here.

"Pacific Rim," a Warner Bros. release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America "for sequences of intense sci-fi action and violence throughout, and brief language." Running time: 131 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.


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Source: Roger Ebert.com

Quote:
4 stars

If I were nine years old, I would see the monsters-versus-robots adventure "Pacific Rim" 50 times. Because I'm in my forties and have two kids and two jobs, I'll have to be content with seeing it a couple more times in theaters and re-watching it on video.

Like George Lucas' original 1977 "Star Wars", Guillermo del Toro's sci-fi actioner uses high technology to pump up disreputable subject matter to Hollywood blockbuster levels. The film's main selling point is its overscaled action sequences. In a terrified futureworld, spindly-limbed, whale-sized beasts emerge from a Hellmouth on the ocean floor and duke it out with immense robots. The robots are run by two-pilot teams whose movements suggest tai chi exercises taking place on the world's largest, weirdest elliptical machines. They work in pairs because they use their minds and bodies to guide the machines in the way that puppeteers guide puppets, and the technology is too complex for a single brain to handle. The creatures began attacking years before the start of the story proper (we get the history in a prologue). The humans can't fight the monsters by conventional military means because it causes too much collateral damage. They created the robots—called Jaegers—to engage them directly, before the creatures, called Kaiju, could make landfall. Over time the beasts have become bigger, nastier, more resourceful, as if they're evolving. And now they seem to be winning. Humankind is in retreat.

The fight scenes are often shot too close-in for my taste, and they go on too long, particularly during the final stretch—a problem that also afflicted"Iron Man 3," "Star Trek Into Darkness," "Man of Steel" and other recent summer films—and there are times when one of the combatants will use a weapon so devastating that you wonder why they didn't just haul it out at the start of the fight and make the punching, kicking and flipping unnecessary. Nitpicks aside, though, the fights are astonishing. They split the difference between classical filmmaking and the blurrier, more chaotic modern style in a way that made me appreciate the virtues of both. Some of the whirling action has a geometric beauty that's faintly Cubist, and each fight contains surprises: a tactic you haven't seen yet, a power you didn't know about, a complication you didn't see coming.

But for all its mayhem, "Pacific Rim" is a film with more more emotion than its trailers could have led you to expect. The hero, Raleigh Becket (Charlie Hunnam) is an ace pilot who gave up robot-piloting for coastal wall-building when his partner and older brother Yancy (Diego Klattenhoff) died fighting a monster. The pilots don't just share physical responsibilities, they have unfettered access to one another's memories, and must struggle not just to control their thoughts during combat, but to avoid being thrown off when their co-pilot lets a distracting or traumatic image slip through.

Raleigh thinks the bond he had with his brother can never be replicated, that his loss was irreplaceable. He learns otherwise when he's paired with a young woman named Mako Mori (Rinko Kikuchi), who lost her parents in a Tokyo monster attack many years earlier. The story of their burgeoning partnership is not just that of pilot/copilot, but brother/sister, or friend/friend (but not boyfriend/girlfriend, refreshingly). It's about learning to trust another person enough to allow their consciousness to fuse with yours.

The film contains many more examples of this sort of human dyad, including Mako and the robot fighters' commanding officer Stacker Penetcost (Idris Elba), who feels fatherly tenderness toward Mako and doesn't want her risking her life, and scientists Newton Geiszler (Charlie Day) and Gottlieb (Burn Gorman), who try to understand the kaiju's biology, and haggle over whether to use an intuitive or data-based approach. ("Numbers are as close as we come to the handwriting of God," Gottlieb says; he's right, but not as right as he thinks.) The movie's action is physical, but it's also metaphorical. The metaphors are articulated with such storybook directness and unabashed sentiment that by the end, I found myself thinking about what it means to be in a relationship, be it comprised of siblings, coworkers, lovers, or parents and kids. These people are all just comic-book types, with ridiculous names and cliched back-stories. But their feelings are real. They feel pain. They dream.

"Pacific Rim" stuffs each frame with multiple references to the latest iterations of what even geeks would call "Geek Culture." But for all his fanboy enthusiasm, Del Toro is also a man of taste—that's why he clothed Elba, the most dashing man alive, in a suit and tie rather than a standard sci-fi military general's uniform. There are the expected shout-outs to Godzilla pictures and such robot-driven animes as "Neon Genesis Evangelion", plus hat-tips to George Lucas (in the opening section, the hero's older brother quotes Han Solo's "Don't get cocky, kid"), and way too many borrowings from the shlocky "Independence Day." But there are also nods to Philip K. Dick, Ray Bradbury, Mary Shelley's original "Frankenstein," "2001", "Brainstorm," "Inception," and the fiction of H.P. Lovecraft, whose descriptions of demon-creatures must have informed this picture's effects. (Maybe now Del Toro will get to make his long-dreamed-of Lovecraft adaptation "At the Mountains of Madness.")

There are many shots so striking that they could have served as the poster image: A Jaeger tumbling into an abyss, its E.T. heart pulsing; a little girl's red shoe in a grey ash-heap on a rubble-strewn street; a kaiju unfurling kite-like wings; a one-eyed kaiju-body-parts dealer named Hannibal Chau (Ron Perlman) stalking through wreckage, his steel-tipped dress shoes jangling like cowboy spurs. A simple shot of Elba's character taking off a helmet is infused with such emotion, thanks to its placement in the story and the sunlight haloing the actor's head, that it would have made John Wayne cry.

Del Toro and his cowriter Travis Beacham have thought about how daily life, indeed consciousness itself, might change if something like this happened to the planet. There's a hilarious clip of a TV talk show during the overconfident period in which humans thought they'd defeated the beasts: the host teases a giant sea-beast puppet that looks like an ugly, melted Barney the Dinosaur. The names of significant machines and locations have a fairy-tale rightness: "Shatterdome." "The Bone Slum." "Crimson Typhoon." "Trespasser." The sea walls and cityscapes seem beaten down, jury-rigged, exhausted. This is a world seems to have existed long before you began looking at it.

A few hours after I saw "Pacific Rim" for the first time, I had objections to one aspect or another. Days later I can't remember most of them, and in the grand scheme, I don't believe they matter, any more than the "flaws" of "Star Wars" or "The Wizard of Oz" matter. "Pacific Rim" knows what sort of film it wishes to be; it is that film, and much more. In its clanking, crashing way, it's real science fiction, a play of ideas. It's earnest in its belief that all thinking beings are part of a hive mind, or could be. You see the notion acted out onscreen in teams of two or three, in military units and small businesses, in city populations and whole species. This movie made me think of a line from Roger Ebert's review of "Dark City," which he described as "a film to nourish us. Not a story so much as an experience, it is a triumph of art direction, set design, cinematography, special effects--and imagination."


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Source: Fox News

Quote:
‘Pacific Rim’ review: A funny, imaginative film plagued with bad acting

What’s this? A summer blockbuster that isn’t a sequel or a remake? Surely, you can’t be serious.

And serious “Pacific Rim” is not. It may not be anywhere near one of the top films this year, but it certainly is one of the most eccentric and imaginative films of the summer. Part love letter to the genre of Japanese Kaiju monster films spawned in the wake of “Godzilla,” part raucous war-time flyboy film, Guillermo del Toro’s biggest movie to date is, at its core, quintessential del Toro beneath layers of megatons of screeching metallic gusto.

A fantastic prologue puts the audience into the mix immediately, showing how a rift in the bottom of the Pacific created a wormhole into another dimension where an army of monsters called Kaiju emerged and attacked our major cities. To fight the monsters, giant robots known as Jaegers were created, which humans would pilot from inside by using a device similar to an eliptical machine. When cocky pilot Raleigh’s (“Sons of Anarchy’s” Charlie Hunnam) brother is killed by one of the Kaiju, he must come to terms with his own inadequacies and join one of the sole remaining rebellions against the Kaiju.

Guillermo del Toro’s signature style is prevalent in almost every shot, despite an exponentially larger scope than the director may be accustomed to. Everything from the production design to the costume’s (especially Ron Perlman’s funky glasses) to the angular features of the Kaiju are very much del Toro staples, as are the gritty and gothic Hong Kong street scenes. Fans of “Hellboy” and “Pan’s Labyrinth” will surely find “Pacific Rim” to be a culmination of the director’s visual oeuvre, plus discovering plenty new material. Even a recurring del Toro motif of a misunderstood or abandoned child makes its way into “Pacific Rim” with an interesting but slightly underdeveloped backstory for Raliegh’s counterpart Mako Mori (Rinko Kikuchi).

Del Toro weaves his very own mythology throughout the film, circumventing the massive battle sequences and creating some minor but zany depth to this world, like creating the “drift”, a temporal connection between the Jaeger pilots, which allow their minds to connect as one; or the mysterious monster world which exists in another dimension and is the true origin of our dinosaurs. This mythology is pure Guillermo del Toro but the director, as well as co-writer Travis Beacham only scratch the surface of what could be mined. They leave the fun mythology and “science” stuff to two wacky opposing “scientists,” both tongue-in-cheek stereotypes. The first is Charlie Day doing a wonderful Rick Moranis/Bobcast Goldthwait one-off as the overzealous and nerdy Dr. Newton Geiszler and the classically German mad-scientist Gottlieb (Burn Gorman). More than any other character in the film, these two embody that wildly imaginative del Toro mind.

The film does become stagnant in between the battle sequences. During these scenes the story relies on training montages or jealous in-fighting between the Jaeger pilots, which is rather dull compared to the battles and the mythology. The stale acting does not help these moments either. The film could be far better if the bridges between the battles were more involving.

The scenes of mass destruction are obviously frequent throughout this epic battle between 25-story tall robots and massive dinosaur-like monsters, but what separates this heap of destruction from other recent fare like “Man of Steel” and “Transformers” is that del Toro never stops to show us just how “awesome” the destruction is. Thankfully he spares us those overlong 20 to 30 second shots of skyscrapers crumbling to the ground, which would put “Pacific Rim” in the graveyard of broken cinema. The focus during the battles is almost always on the Jaeger and Kaiju.

“Pacific Rim” is never pretentious and is often funny, which makes it lofty and entertaining, despite some rancid performances. Except for Charlie Day, Ron Perlman and the sublime Idris Elba, the performances are often cringe-worthy. Under ordinary circumstances, bad acting can sink a film, but del Toro has presented such an extensive buffet of goodies that it’s easy to look past the acting (it’s not as if the characters require top-notch acting in the first place) and get lost in this brave new world. Elba, of course, steals the show as the no-holds-barred commander Stacker Pentecost. His great line “Today we are cancelling the apocalypse” has already made it into this year’s pop culture lexicon and is one of the highlights of the film.

Finally, props to Warner Brothers for releasing a wildly imaginative sci-fi romp of this scale which isn’t a sequel or remake. Despite “Pacific Rim’s” flaws, here’s hoping enough people see it and like it to send the message to all the studios that it’s not always a bad idea to produce new material, especially from directors like del Toro who certainly knows how to make a commercial film with a unique and visionary style.


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Source: SuperHeroHype

Quote:
Sometimes I'm reminded of the Saturday afternoon matinees I would go see with my Dad when I was a kid. Most of them consisted of science fiction movies, which is one of the major things we bonded over. Every once in a while now I'll see a movie and think “This is a movie I wish I could have seen with my Dad.” Not only to recreate that experience of a childhood memory,but because when you see a movie you love with someone that you're close with, it almost increases your appreciation of the film. Even if it's a movie you don't particularly like, it becomes about the experience of witnessing it together. I know for a fact I wouldn't love RoboCop, Terminator, Star Wars, or Predator as much as I do if it weren't for seeing them with my Dad. Pacific Rim is the best example of a “Dad movie” that I've seen in some time, and that's not a diss, it's a major compliment.

In his first directing gig since 2008's Hellboy II, Guillermo del Toro has crafted what is an almost perfect summer movie experience. Along with co-writer Travis Beacham, Del Toro has created one of the most interesting and unique worlds that I've seen in a film in years. Set in a distant future where giant monsters are an almost every day problem, Del Toro has taken the ideas of kaiju movies from the '50s and '60s and modernized them like no other filmmaker has done. How would the world react to this problem? Pacific Rim chooses not to go for a “real world approach,” which is par for the course in modern films, but instead embraces the fiction and creates the most satisfying sci-fi film of the year.

The world building of Pacific Rim is handled with near perfect precision, showing the circumstances of why we need giant robots, called Jaegers, and how these things operate. Though viewers get to see a substantial amount of information throughout the film, at the end it feels like we've only been allowed a brief peek into the world that Del Toro and Beacham have created. There are so many avenues to explore and elaborate on, but unlike some films, Pacific Rim knows exactly what story it is trying to tell and doesn't waste time with pointless scequences.

Each summer sees its film slate getting bigger and trying to top what was done before it. More things need to blow up, entire cities needed to be toppled, or the planet has to blow up. Pacific Rim likely has the biggest scope of any of these films because it is very much a global event. This isn't America or Japan's fight, it's humanity's, and that makes it an even more special film to witness. Its themes of inclusion and teamwork hammer home its overall message, something that so many other special effects-filled films throw by the way side. Even though the movie is entirely global, it never once loses its focus on the story at hand. Given that this is such an elaborate world, it is a real testament to the filmmakers' abilities to make the story feel as personal and intimate as it does.

While the special effects in the film are flawless, it is the characters of Pacific Rim that hook you into the wild roller coaster that it becomes. Sons of Anarchy's Charlie Hunnam leads a cast that is one of the most unique and memorable assemblages of characters. Hunnam's “every man” demeanor and character motivations make him instantly likable and easy to root for. Idris Elba also stars in the film as Stacker Pentecost and carries much of the film's dramatic weight as well as some of the best laughs. International star Rinko Kikuchi really surprised me as Mako Mori by delivering a performance that was full of passion and intensity that is not seen nearly enough in female characters in these huge tentpole movies.

What is really remarkable about the cast is that, though it's so huge, you get plenty of time with all the characters and still want more because they're all so lovable. From Charlie Day's “Kaiju Groupie” Dr. Newton, who has some of the best lines in the movies, to Burn Gorman's Gottlieb, whose over-the-top performance might be one of the best in the film, there's someone for every kind of person to latch onto and want more to see more of. But the most memorable of them all, and who could carry his own spin-off movie, is Ron Perlman's Hannibal Chau. There was almost a more audible reaction from the audience upon his reveal than some of the Jaeger/Kaiju fights. Perlman's character deals in black market Kaiju organs and is one of the most unique supporting roles in any summer movie.


The thing most people will remember about Pacific Rim however is its special effects, which are awe inspiring. While Del Toro is most well known for relying on practical effects, of which there is a surprising amount, this movie has some of the most impressive CGI that I've ever seen. If you don't at least crack a smile when a Jaeger punches the hell out of a Kaiju's face, then I suspect you might be an alien. Giant Robots and monsters have never looked so good and coupled with Del Toro's impeccable camera work and steady editing, it only makes other giant robot movies look worse in comparison. Beyond the jaw-dropping visuals of the fights. the designs for Pacific Rim's Jaegers and Kaiju are some of the coolest in ages. Seeing these titans duke it out on such a grandiose scale is exactly the movie we all imagined when playing with our toys as kids and to witness it on the big screen is a total dream come true.

Pacific Rim is all that is good and right about summer blockbusters. It has everything. Action, adventure, romance, humor, mesmerizing special effects and one of the most memorable scores this year. It is the definition of an audience experience. In a world full of overly dark movies steeped in the Post-9/11 mentality, it's such a breath of fresh air to experience a movie whose prime motivation is fun and not a reminder of what is on the news. It's not too much to ask that more movies try and be about entertaining their audience instead of depressing us, because Pacific Rim knows how to treat you right. Go see it with your Dad.

Rating: 9.5 / 10


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Source: Washington Post

Quote:
‘Pacific Rim’ review: A rock ’em, sock ’em sci-fi spectacle with heart

“Pacific Rim” is a big, lumbering, rock ’em, sock ’em mash-up of metallic heft and hyperbole, a noisy, overproduced disaster flick that sucks its characters and the audience down a vortex of garish visual effects and risibly cartoonish action.

And you know what? It’s not bad!

Leave it to Guillermo del Toro — that overgrown fanboy with a heart of gold and a mind of impressive philosophical complexity — to bring some sense and sensibility to this summer’s crop of dumb spectacles. “Pacific Rim” will never qualify as part of the director’s high-end oeuvre — “Pan’s Labyrinth,” it most decidedly ain’t. But as an example of del Toro’s abiding love for comic books, pop culture and movie genre excess, it ranks with his less intellectual but equally imaginative efforts, maybe somewhere between “Blade II” and the gloriously bodacious “Hellboy.”

In fact, “Hellboy’s” mordant star, Ron Perlman, shows up for a cameo in “Pacific Rim,” not sheathed in red leathery skin but his own, as a black marketeer working Hong Kong’s neon-noir byways. It’s in that port city, sometime in the future, that an apocalyptic invasion of sea creatures called Kaiju will or won’t be repelled by a ragtag army of Jaegers, 25-story robots that look like super-size versions of Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man, right down to the whirring mechanical hearts that glow in their tungsten-clad chests.

“Iron Man” isn’t the only movie “Pacific Rim” conjures in the course of its overlong running time. The central standoff between fantastical creatures bears echoes of “Mothra vs. Godzilla,” as well as the anime classics that del Toro has cited as inspirations. The visual design recalls “TRON,” some plot elements recall “Inception,” the crunching action recalls “Transformers” and the relationships recall “Top Gun,” wherein a group of cocky flyboys try to one-up each other in the name of saving the world.

At least that’s the initial vibe of “Pacific Rim,” which begins as brothers Yancy (Diego Klattenhoff) and Raleigh (Charlie Hunnam) suit up to inhabit their Jaeger, which is powered by two people who meld minds in order to create a unified consciousness, the better to smoothly manipulate their giant armored sheath and dispatch the voracious Kaiju.

But what begins as just another boys-and-their-toys smash-and-gab turns into something more, as del Toro expands the Jaeger universe into something far more balanced, even nuanced. The fantastic English actor Idris Elba gives “Pacific Rim” sex appeal and gravitas as the Jaegers’ commander, Stacker Pentecost, a titanic force and physical specimen himself. When Raleigh meets an ambitious, beautiful Jaeger pilot trainee named Mako (Rinko Kikuchi), “Pacific Rim” promises to introduce some welcome gender balance to the world of end-of-the-world heroics.

And del Toro, ever mindful of the exigencies of the genre, never succumbs to the humorlessness and over-plotting that has dragged down so many of his contemporaries this season: He keeps “Pacific Rim” firmly focused on its utterly absurd raison d’etre (Kill those Kaiju once and for all! You’re welcome, Hong Kong!). But he makes sure to leaven that mission with moments of humor, most often at the hands of two goofy Jaeger research scientists, played by the charmingly hapless Charlie Day and Burn Gorman, who proves the rare performer capable of channeling Jerry Lewis and Roddy McDowall simultaneously.

“Pacific Rim” isn’t nearly as visually rich as del Toro’s finest efforts: The ultimate showdown between the opposing behemoth forces is a murky soup of pulsating blue lights and writhing steel (as always, 3-D adds nothing to this enterprise), punctuated by dialogue clearly written in the belief that shouting something loudly enough makes it less ridiculous.

But “Pacific Rim” earns points for some terrific performances (Elba’s chief among them), maintaining consistently engaging momentum and for making the radical — if subtle — suggestion that empathy can be a bona fide superpower. That humanistic touch is pure del Toro, and it makes all the difference in “Pacific Rim,” whose own whirring, glowing heart doesn’t belong to any machine but to the director himself.


2 and 1/2 stars


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Fri Jul 12, 2013 11:53 am
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Post Re: Critic Review Round Up! 'Pacific Rim'
seeing this tuesday with my mum.

TODAY, WE ARE CANCELLING THE APOCALYPSE!

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Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:08 pm
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Post Re: Critic Review Round Up! 'Pacific Rim'
Going to wait till it is on DVD to see this. I hate movie theaters.

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Fri Jul 12, 2013 6:45 pm
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Post Re: Critic Review Round Up! 'Pacific Rim'
Watchin' this in like 15 mins.

Aw yeaaaa.

/stoked

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Fri Jul 12, 2013 7:13 pm
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Post Re: Critic Review Round Up! 'Pacific Rim'
THIS MOVIE WAS AWESOME!

SO AWESOME!

YAY GIPSY DANGER IS SO COOL!

AWESOME

O.O

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Sat Jul 13, 2013 6:29 am
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Post Re: Critic Review Round Up! 'Pacific Rim'
Can't comment on movie's awesomeness, pooped pants. Hard. Must go to pants store.

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Primary Military Specialty: Commando
Secondary Military Specialty: Airborne
Grade: E5
Post Re: Critic Review Round Up! 'Pacific Rim'
mum and i loved it.

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Tue Jul 16, 2013 11:57 am
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